So You’re Not Steven Spielberg

YouTube and Social Media

Get Started on YouTube

Let’s say you’re not Steven Spielberg, award-winning director and producer of Saving Private Ryan, Schindler’s List, and over a hundred more memorable, entertaining films. (That is, unless you really are Spielberg, in which case you’ve just proved, by reading this, that you’re also a savvy marketing strategist). We at Professional Mojo aren’t Mr. Spielberg either (in case you were wondering).

But you’re probably not Mr. Spielberg, and maybe you don’t know your way around today’s video cameras. Technology changes fast, and many of the new cameras offer features that can seem unfamiliar and confusing.

But no doubt you’ve also seen plenty of YouTube videos, so you know that people are using these cameras to shoot and upload footage. Some of the videos out there are simply intended to be cute and funny, like the ones with kids and kittens.

But there’s a lot more to YouTube than kittens.

Did you know that approximately 85% of the total US internet audience now watches online videos? Of those videos, about 43% come from YouTube. Think of it: when you create a video for your small business, YouTube gives you the potential to reach thousands or hundreds of thousands of consumers, customers, and clients.

Statistics show that YouTube hosts around 144 million—that’s so impressive, let’s say it again—144 million UNIQUE visitors each month. That’s about one-third of the U.S. population. Since Google purchased YouTube, YouTube has also overtaken Yahoo as the second most popular search engine, which is great for search engine optimization words.

See where we’re going with this? YouTube is a powerful, exciting marketing and social media tool.  If you aren’t using it, it’s time to start.

You don’t have to be a Spielberg to shoot a 30-second clip that promotes your product or service on YouTube, which is free, easily accessible, and unbelievably popular.

YouTube has features that allow you to cross-promote your small business and build communities. Users and viewers can share videos via Facebook, Twitter, Stumbleupon, and other networking platforms.

YouTube is instantaneous. With a few clicks, you can send a video promoting your business to all your contacts at once, immediately reaching your target audience and, if you wish, everyone in your personal, social network.

In our next post, we’ll tell you how to choose a video camera wisely, to get you on the way to recording your own YouTube content. As they say, see you at the movies.

 

 

Source for YouTube statistics:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lFTHOkCj0-I

 

Social Media Entitlement Might Bite You

I logged into my personal Facebook account today (you know, the one where all of my weird high school friends and husband’s family lurk) and many of them had gone hog wild Liking every type of conceivable page: brands, products, services, events, and more. You name it and some were Liking 12-18 pages at a time.

So, I asked a few of them what was going on. Why the flurry of Likes and why were they spamming me begging me to Like the pages, too?  The answer: because they will get something for free. The following conversation ensued and was informative.

Social Media entitlement

You like us! You really, really do! (but for how long?)

Me: “How often do you expect a discount or a freebie when you Like a page?”

Jessica: “All the time. I should get something for being in the community just about every day. Honestly, that’s why I Liked them, right?”

Me: “But, what if they also gave you great news, articles, lifestyle tips and only the occasional coupon or discount?”

Jessica: “I don’t think I’d care. They promised me stuff, didn’t say anything about that. And if I don’t get something, I’ll Unlike them right away. In fact, if it’s a one-time special, after the special is over I’ll Unlike them probably so my stream doesn’t clutter up.”

Jessica wasn’t the only person I’ve talked to who says that they are solely prompted by something for nothing and will drop that page like a hot potato once the gravy-train ends.

What’s the moral of the story?

  • Luring people into Liking your page with a steady stream of contests, give-aways and freebies only feeds the need for more and bigger give-aways.
  • A community built on this type of strategy is not a community at all. Social media is about creating relationships and dialog. It’s become perverted by johnny-come-latelys who are pressured to increase numbers, not seek engagement.
  • Your metrics will be skewed because people will Unlike you at the blink of an eye as soon as their entitlement ends, yet you sure looked great while you were giving away stuff!
Look, it’s fine to run a contest, incite excitement, and we, too, manage communities where we use contests, discounts and coupons to reward members. However, these specials are only occasional and we ensure that we are engaging with them in many other ways: questions, articles, news, etc. How can you solve a problem for them today or improve their life?

So, what do they really receive for being a member of your community? If it’s only about getting something for free, then you are not creating evangelists for your brand. And you’ll be the hot potato they drop next.

In summary, focus on quality. Focus on targeted folks who really want to hear about what you do and how you do it. Focus on making their lives better. Then, surprise them once in a while with a really great reward.

 

Interested in growing communities who are suited to you and want to hear what you have to say? Contact Professional Mojo Marketing for more.

 

Social Media: That First Date is Important

I almost hate to use the words social media on a first date with a prospect. They have a hollow ring now that the bandwagon overflows with newbies, wannabes, could-have-beens and once-weres. I don’t blame anyone for looking with suspicion on those who yap incessantly about this being their ‘sweet spot’ and having a ‘deep and thorough understanding’ of this ‘cutting edge technology’, being able to find ‘thousands and thousands’ of followers, or who ‘are native’ to the ‘digital language’.

Pfffft. That’s what I think of it. None of that means anything. Not. A. Thing.

If I were you, what would I want to ask on a first date with a prospective marketing partner? Well, surprise, the same things we’ve always wanted to know. I want to see sound planning and strategy. I want to see real results for real clients. No, no…not the ubiquitous ‘buzz’, but real results that track back to the business objectives.

Does this sound familiar? It should. Good processes, good planning and sound strategy have been the hallmarks of great marketing and advertising since the first wooly mammoth steak was marketed to the tribe. Ask your date how much she knows about your business, your industry and how your business objectives can be achieved in measurable ways using new media – in conjunction with your overall strategy and your other channels.

If you don’t get a good answer, I hope you didn’t pay for the dinner. Move on.

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